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Recall Roundup: 780K Toyotas among this week’s top recalls

Recall Roundup: 780K Toyotas among this week’s top recalls

Photo: Reuters

A look at this week’s top recalls you need to know about to keep your family safe.

Toyota is recalling nearly 780,000 crossovers and hybrid sedans, including some RAV4 models, to fix a suspension defect that could cause a crash.

After more than $2 million in damage from fires and burns, a company is recalling 12 brands of its dehumidifiers.

Build-A-Bear recalls stuffed animals, after the eyes detach and pose a choking hazard.

“Count my Kisses, 1, 2, 3” is among the children’s books being recalled due to a metal bar that can expose a sharp edge and potentially cut the reader.

Air pistols that could potentially explode at high temperatures are being recalled.

Faulty wire socket insulation is being blamed for the recall of ceiling mounted light fixtures that pose a threat of electrical shock.

This science toy could be mistaken by a child for candy, and if ingested, could expand inside the child’s body. The toys do not show up on an X-ray and would need to be removed by surgery.

For more information on these or other recalls, visit the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

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Rice replaces ice in India bucket challenge

An Indian school boy eats a midday meal provided free at a government school in Hyderabad, India, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013. India has offered free midday school meals since the 1960s in an effort to persuade poor parents to send their children to school, a program that reaches some 120 million children. The country now plans to subsidize wheat, rice and cereals for some 800 million people under a $20 billion scheme to cut malnutrition and ease poverty.

The famous "ice bucket" challenge is inspiring thousands of Indians to follow suit, but with a twist - they are replacing ice with rice to help the country's hungry people.