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More Americans workout while working

More Americans workout while working

Josh Baldonado, an administrative assistant at Brown & Brown Insurance, works at a treadmill desk in the firms offices in Carmel, Ind., Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013. Workers sign up for 30 slots not he treadmills and have their phone and computer transferred to the workstations. Being glued to your desk is no longer an excuse for not having time to exercise as a growing number of Americans are standing, walking and even cycling their way through the work day at treadmill desks, standup desks or other moving work stations. Photo: Associated Press/AP Photo/Michael Conroy

WASHINGTON (AP) — Being glued to your desk is no longer an excuse for not having time to exercise.

A growing number of Americans are standing, walking and even cycling their way through the work day at treadmill desks, standup desks or other moving workstations.

Retailers say sales of treadmill desks that let you work while walking 1-2 mph are way up as large corporations, including Microsoft, Coca Cola and Procter & Gamble, have started buying the workstations in bulk.

Companies say they like the idea of helping employees stay healthy, lose weight and reduce stress — especially if it means lower insurance costs and higher productivity.

Recent studies have shown that too much sitting can lead to obesity and increase the risk of blood pressure and heart disease.

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