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MLB suspensions: Who’s next?

MLB suspensions: Who’s next?

Who's next? That's the question being asked after Ryan Braun accepted a 65-game suspension. Photo: Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Who’s next? That’s the question being asked after Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun accepted a 65-game suspension for unspecified “violations” of baseball’s drug program and labor contract Monday.

The 2011 National League MVP was suspended without pay for the rest of the season and the postseason is what’s expected to be the start of sanctions involving players reportedly tied to a Florida clinic accused of distributing performance-enhancing drugs.

Among those linked in media reports to Biogenesis are the Yankees’ Alex Rodriguez and four of this year’s All-Stars, including Texas outfielder Nelson Cruz, San Diego shortstop Everth Cabrera, Oakland pitcher Bartolo Colon and Detroit shortstop Jhonny Peralta.

Some players are reacting with anger. Seattle outfielder Jason Bay says Braun’s previous denials of drug use and his heartfelt apology this spring “kills” all players’ credibility on the topic of performance enhancing drugs.

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