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Minn. town has 4-year-old boy as mayor

Minn. town has 4-year-old boy as mayor

In this photo made Wednesday, June 26, 2013 in Dorset , Minn., Bobby Tufts, the small town's 4-year-old mayor, poses for a photo before starting the Ronald McDonald fundraising walk. Bobby was only 3 when he won election last year as mayor of Dorset (population 22 to 28, depending on whether the minister and his family are in town). Dorset, which bills itself as the Restaurant Capital of the World, has no formal city government. Photo: Associated Press/Jeff Baenen

DORSET, Minn. (AP) — In the tiny Minnesota tourist town of Dorset, the mayor is a short guy known for his fondness of ice cream and fishing. He’s got the county’s top cop in his pocket.

And he’s 4 years old.

Mayor Robert “Bobby” Tufts was only 3 when he won election last year as mayor of Dorset, a town of a little more than 20 people in the lakes and pines of northern Minnesota. Bobby can pull it off because the job’s ceremonial. His only major act so far has been to put ice cream at the top of the food pyramid.

Hubbard County Sheriff Cory Aukes is a fan, calling Bobby “a cute little bugger.”

The kid mayor is seeking a second term next month.

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