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Lakers snap up Kaman to replace Howard

Lakers snap up Kaman to replace Howard

File photo of Chris Kaman (C) controlling the ball during a practice session in Mexico City October 11, 2010. Photo: Reuters/Henry Romero

(Reuters) – The Los Angeles Lakers moved quickly to absorb the loss of Dwight Howard by reaching an agreement to sign free agent center Chris Kaman on Monday.

After the NBA’s prized big man Howard chose to leave the Lakers in favor of the Houston Rockets last week, Los Angeles began the process of recouping by agreeing to a one-year deal with a new seven-footer.

The 31-year-old Kaman will ink a contract worth approximately $3.2 million, according to local reports, when free agents can officially sign on Wednesday.

“I am going to be going back to LA and it’s to play for the Lakers! I am excited about this move and can’t wait to play!” Kaman posted on his Twitter feed.

Entering his 11th season, Kaman has career averages of 11.8 points and eight rebounds and just completed a one-year campaign with the Dallas Mavericks.

He was an All Star in 2010 while playing for the Los Angeles Clippers.

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