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House Republicans to pass own debt limit plan on Tuesday

House Republicans to pass own debt limit plan on Tuesday

SHUTDOWN DEADLOCK: Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, with House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., right, walks to a meeting of House Republicans at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013, as a partial government shutdown enters its third week. It is not yet clear how Boehner and tea party members in the House majority will respond to the Senate's Democratic and Republican leaders closing in on a deal to avoid an economy-menacing Treasury default and end the partial government shutdown. Photo: Associated Press/AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republicans in the House of Representatives on Tuesday hope to pass their own version of legislation to reopen the federal government that would differ from a plan now emerging from Senate negotiations, Republican lawmakers and aides said.

The Republican version would be similar to the Senate plan but would include two key concessions on “Obamacare” health reforms, said Republican Representative Darrell Issa.

These include a two-year delay of a tax on medical devices that helps fund insurance subsidies as well as a requirement that Congress and top Obama administration cabinet officials obtain health coverage under the program.

Aides said the House plan calls for an extension of government funding at current levels through Jan. 15 and an extension of borrowing authority through Feb. 7.

Issa said the House version would not allow the U.S. Treasury to renew its extraordinary cash management measures, which could stretch borrowing capacity for months.

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