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Facebook change raising safety concerns

Facebook change raising safety concerns

FACEBOOK FRIENDS: Critics say it will be harder to keep teens safe online since Facebook has relaxed its privacy settings for those aged 13-17. Photo: clipart.com

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — It’s a change that affects Facebook users who list their ages as between 13 and 17. And it’s a policy that is leading to concerns about how the popular social networking site lets people share information.

Facebook will now allow teens to share their posts with anyone on the Internet.

Until now, such younger Facebook users had been limited to sharing information and photos only to their own friends or friends of those friends.

The change is raising concerns that minors could leave a digital trail that could lead to trouble.

For its part, Facebook says it decided to revise its privacy rules to make its service more enjoyable for teens and to provide them with a more powerful forum when they believe they have an important point to make or a cause to support.

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