News

Desktops are so last year, demand for tablets climbs

Desktops are so last year, demand for tablets climbs

APPLE CRAZY: Worldwide demand for tablets, like iPads, is continuing to climb. Photo: Reuters

LONDON (Reuters) – Strong demand for tablets such as Apple’s iPad will help worldwide shipments of web-enabled devices rise in 2013, offsetting a decline in desktop and laptop computers, research company Gartner said on Monday.

Combined shipments of computers, tablets and mobile phones will reach 2.32 billion units in 2013, a 4.5 percent increase on 2012, Gartner forecast. Shipments of tablets are expected to rise 53.4 percent to 184 million.

Traditional desktop and laptop computers will continue to decline, with shipments forecast to total 303 million units, an 11.2 percent drop on 2012, the research group said.

The mobile phone market will continue to experience steady growth, it said, with shipments projected to increase by 3.7 percent to more than 1.8 billion units, it said.

Price competition is strongest for the smaller, 7-inch, tablets, Gartner said.

“We expect this holiday season to be all about smaller tablets as even the long-term holiday favorite – the smartphone – loses its appeal,” said Carolina Milanesi, the firm’s research vice president.

Recent Headlines

in Sports

This week’s top sports shots

little

A look at the biggest stories and best photography in sports this week.

in Sports

This weekend’s sports schedule

yankees

A complete look at this weekend's sports schedule.

in National

Making headlines this week

surf

A look at the week's biggest newsmakers and the stories you won't soon forget.

in National

WATCH: The history of Labor Day

21-overlay4

While you take your three day weekend, remember those who struggled to get Friday and Saturday off.

in Lifestyle

Rice replaces ice in India bucket challenge

An Indian school boy eats a midday meal provided free at a government school in Hyderabad, India, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013. India has offered free midday school meals since the 1960s in an effort to persuade poor parents to send their children to school, a program that reaches some 120 million children. The country now plans to subsidize wheat, rice and cereals for some 800 million people under a $20 billion scheme to cut malnutrition and ease poverty.

The famous "ice bucket" challenge is inspiring thousands of Indians to follow suit, but with a twist - they are replacing ice with rice to help the country's hungry people.