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CVS, Walgreens boycott Rolling Stone over Tsarnaev cover

CVS, Walgreens boycott Rolling Stone over Tsarnaev cover

CVS has decided to boycott the latest edition of Rolling Stone over it's cover image. Photo: Associated Press

UPDATE: Walgreens announced in a Tweet that it has joined CVS in boycotting the current issue of Rolling Stone magazine.

In response to a controversial Rolling Stone cover that sparked outrage online, CVS has announced it will not sell the edition of the traditionally music-based magazine “out of respect for the victims of the attack and their loved ones.”

The cover features a self-taken photo of accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhohkar Tsarnaev, which critics have claimed glorify the alleged murderer. CVS has particularly strong roots in New England markets including Boston.

The full CVS statement is as follows:

“CVS/pharmacy has decided not to sell the current issue of Rolling Stone featuring a cover photo of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect. As a company with deep roots in New England and a strong presence in Boston, we believe this is the right decision out of respect for the victims of the attack and their loved ones.”

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