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Texan survives being hit by lightning twice

Texan survives being hit by lightning twice

HE'S ELECTRIC: Casey Wagner was struck by lightning - twice - and survived. Photo: YouTube

SAINT JO, Texas (AP) — An off-road racing enthusiast has survived being struck by lightning twice during the same storm in North Texas.

Casey Wagner said Sunday that doctors told him a tingling feeling would last for about a week.

KTVT-TV reports Wagner was at an off-road competition in Saint Jo, 85 miles northwest of Dallas, when storms arrived.

The 31-year-old Wagner was under a tree when he was hit by lightning.

He dropped to his knees then he was struck again. Wagner says he saw sparks during the strikes.

A nurse who happened to be nearby cared for Wagner until he was taken to a hospital, where he was treated and released.

Wagner says he believes God kept him alive — and he plans to start going to church more.

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