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Super Bowl bets: Seafood, green chiles among wagers

Super Bowl bets: Seafood, green chiles among wagers

BETS: Good food is on the line at Super Bowl 48. Photo: Associated Press

DENVER (AP) — It’s time for those Super Bowl bets.

The mayors of Seattle and Denver have a friendly wager with some good eats on the line. Seattle Mayor Ed Murray is putting up salmon and Dungeness crab.

Should the Seahawks win, Denver Mayor Michael B. Hancock will send green chile, Denver’s favorite fiery stew to Seattle.

The Denver Broncos and Seahawks meet in the Super Bowl this coming Sunday.

Super Bowl betting boom

With the Super Bowl approaching, fans are talking trash, buying snacks, and, more than ever, placing bets.

Fans bet an unprecedented $99 million on the Super Bowl last year, and Nevada sports books collected record amounts of football wagers during the tail end of 2013.

All of this is changing the role of the humble sports book, which casinos used to see as an amenity that kept customers from going next door, but now expect to turn a profit.

Odds makers alike attribute the rise in betting to the increase in televised games, and the ubiquity of sports analysis.

Amateur gamblers are more likely to bet on a game they can watch, and the proliferation of sports podcasts, blogs and websites have all made them feel more confident in their opinions.

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