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‘Selfie,’ ‘twerk’ top year’s ‘most annoying words’ list

‘Selfie,’ ‘twerk’ top year’s ‘most annoying words’ list

YOU'RE SO ANNOYING: Singer Justin Bieber takes a selfie with a fan. Photo: Associated Press/Dan Steinberg/Invision

ED WHITE, Associated Press

DETROIT (AP) — A Michigan university has issued its annual list of annoying words, and those flexible enough to take selfies of themselves twerking should take note.

Since 1975, Lake Superior State University has announced a batch of words to banish due to overuse and other faults. Spokesman Tom Pink says there were more than 2,000 nominations this year.

“Selfie” led the way. It means snapping a self-photo, usually with a smartphone.

PHOTOS: Celebrity selfies | 17 photos of Miley Cyrus twerking in 2013

“Twerk” or “twerking,” a sexually provocative way of dancing, found a dominant place due to Miley Cyrus’ MTV Video Music Awards performance.

And Lake Superior State says enough already with “Mr. Mom,” a reference to dads who take care of kids.

Pat Byrnes of Chicago says the title is an insult to millions of men who are primary caregivers at home.

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