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Queen’s Brian May celebrates cancer ‘all-clear’

Queen’s Brian May celebrates cancer ‘all-clear’

CANCER FREE: Brian May arrives for the Kerrang! Awards 2013, London, Thursday, June. 13. Photo: Associated Press/ Jonathan Short/Invision

Queen rocker Brian May celebrated with a cup of tea after doctors ruled him free of prostate cancer.

The veteran guitarist underwent a number of tests and scans over the festive holiday in a bid to rule out cancer after doctors found abnormalities while treating him for torn spinal discs.

Last week, May told fans he had been given “mainly good news” as a number of test results had come back negative, but he was still waiting for the results of a prostate biopsy.

The “We Will Rock You” hitmaker has now returned to his official blog to declare he has been given the all-clear from prostate cancer, and he celebrated the good news by making himself a cup of tea.

He writes, “Well, I got a great phone call from my specialist this evening. He said… ‘I have good news. The result of your prostate biopsy is here and we did not find any cancer cells’. So finally, as far as that vital organ is concerned, I am – thank God – in the clear. It’s a great relief. I celebrated in the studio with a cup of tea. Hey… I know how to rock! There are still some mysteries to solve, but I am going to count my blessings and get back into life in the big wide world.”

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