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Police: Man takes toilet tank with Subway sandwich

Police: Man takes toilet tank with Subway sandwich

HE TOOK A SUB AND MORE: Seattle police say a man took more than dinner home from a Subway restaurant. Photo: clipart.com

By Jonathan Kaminsky

(Reuters) – Seattle police are looking for a man suspected of stealing the toilet tank from a restaurant bathroom as workers at a Subway sandwich franchise prepared his family’s meal, police said on Monday.

The man went to the Subway shop in West Seattle with his family on Sunday evening. After placing an order, he entered the restroom and remained inside even after his wife knocked on the door, asking why he was taking so long, and then left without him, Seattle police said in a statement.

When the man eventually emerged from the bathroom, he hurriedly exited the store in possession of a large plastic garbage bag, police said.

An employee who later entered the bathroom discovered the toilet tank was missing. In addition, the bathroom sink was stuffed full of paper towels and still running, while the bathroom key was gone, police said.

Subway workers valued the stolen toilet tank at $550, police said. Witnesses at the scene were able to provide police with a description of the man, who remains at large, police said.

(Editing by Cynthia Johnston and Lisa Shumaker)

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