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NFL, FIFA, others in “think tank” on concussions

NFL, FIFA, others in “think tank” on concussions

CONCUSSIONS: In this Aug. 16 photo, Arkansas guard Brey Cook (74) wears a Riddell SpeedFlex helmet during a preseason NCAA college football practice in Fayetteville, Ark. With lawsuits and concern regarding concussions hanging over every level of football, the race to develop safer helmets and other equipment has never been more intense. Photo: Associated Press/Gareth Patterson

NEW YORK (AP) — Medical officials from the NFL, FIFA and other sports organizations are banding together to look into better ways to identify, manage and treat concussions.

The “think tank,” funded by an educational grant from the NFL, was held yesterday and today at league headquarters in New York.

Dozens of scientific and medical personnel, representing contact sports such as football and rugby to noncontact competitions such as equestrian, took part.

Dr. Rich Ellenbogen, chairman of the NFL’s head, neck and spine committee, says the various sports organizations “need to look at all variations of what is being done around the world.”

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