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Newtown 911 recordings reveal calm, anguish and gunshots

Newtown 911 recordings reveal calm, anguish and gunshots

NEWTOWN SHOOTING: The 911 calls are released. Photo: Reuters

By Edith Honan

DANBURY, Connecticut (Reuters) – Audio recordings from the Connecticut school shooting a year ago that killed 20 children and six educators reveal a mixture of calm and anguish from the callers, and gunshots from the assailant are heard in the background.

Officials in Newtown, Connecticut, were due to release recordings of 911 emergency phone calls from the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School at 2 p.m. Eastern Time. The Connecticut Post newspaper posted the recordings about a half hour before the scheduled release time.

Gunman Adam Lanza, 20, shot dead his mother at home and then entered the school on Dec. 14, 2012, killing 26 people and then himself.

“They’re shooting at the front door, something’s going on … The front glass is all shot out, it kept going on. It’s still happening,” a man calling himself Richard, sounding agitated and confused, tells a 911 emergency operator in one of the seven phone recordings posted on the Connecticut Post.

The operator calmly tells him to take cover.

Town officials initially tried to prevent release of the recordings. The state Freedom of Information Commission ordered the release of seven calls placed from inside the elementary school.

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