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NCAA men’s basketball: Arizona still No. 1

NCAA men’s basketball: Arizona still No. 1

AP NO. 1: Arizona State guard Jahii Carson, middle, shoots between UCLA forward David Wear, left, and guard Norman Powell during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Los Angeles, Sunday, Jan. 12. Photo: Associated Press/Chris Carlson

Arizona and Syracuse remain No. 1 and 2 in The Associated Press college basketball poll for a sixth straight week and six newcomers joined the Top 25.

The Wildcats (17-0) received 61 first-place votes Monday from the 65-member national media panel while the Orange (16-0) got the others.

After 11 ranked teams lost at least one game, the changes started at No. 3 where Wisconsin moved up one spot to replace Ohio State, which lost two games and dropped to 11th.

Michigan State was fourth followed by Wichita State, Villanova, Florida, Iowa State, Oklahoma State and San Diego State.

No. 19 Cincinnati, No. 20 Creighton, No. 22 Pittsburgh, No. 24 Saint Louis, and Oklahoma and UCLA, which tied for 25th, all moved into the rankings this week, replacing Oregon, Missouri, Gonzaga, Illinois and Kansas State.

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