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Most Americans don’t want cell phones on planes

Most Americans don’t want cell phones on planes

PHONES ON A PLANE: Most Americans don't want to be able to use phones on a plane. Photo: clipart.com

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many Americans who fly would rather not listen to other passengers make phone calls during a flight, a new poll says.

The Associated Press-GfK survey finds that 59 percent of travelers who’ve flown at least once in the past year oppose lifting the current ban on in-flight cellphone calls.

Opposition rises to 78 percent among those who’ve flown more than four times.

The Federal Communications Commission is set to begin debate Thursday on a proposal to lift the phone-call restriction.

The agency’s chairman has said there is no longer a technological reason to ban calls.

But just because technology has advanced, it doesn’t mean that etiquette has. Many fliers fear their fellow passengers will subject them to long-winded conversations that are impossible to avoid at 35,000 feet.

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