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More cats than people: Felines take over N.Y. island

More cats than people: Felines take over N.Y. island

CAT ISLAND: There are hundreds of cats on this 85-acre island. Photo: YouTube

NORTH TONAWANDA, N.Y. (AP) — A small island near Buffalo has a big cat problem thanks to people who have abandoned felines there over the years.

WIVB-TV reports that hundreds of feral and abandoned cats are believed to be on the Niagara River’s Tonawanda Island.

Mike Charnock owns a marina and restaurant on the 85-acre island just north of Buffalo. He says the cats are making a mess of the island, and even have gotten onto boats at his marina.

Danielle Coogan has launched Operation Island Cats to stem the growing problem. She’s trapping cats and having them spayed or neutered by veterinarians.

In the last 10 days, she has trapped 10 cats. Kittens will be put up for adoptions. Adult cats will be returned to the island.

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