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MLB intends to ban plate collisions

MLB intends to ban plate collisions

HOME PLATE: In this May 25, 2011, photo, Florida Marlins' Scott Cousins, top, collides with San Francisco Giants catcher Buster Posey on a fly ball hit by Marlins' Emilio Bonifacio during the 12th inning of a baseball game in San Francisco. New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson, chairman of the rules committee, announced Wednesday, Dec. 11 that Major League Baseball plans to eliminate home plate collisions. He said player health and increased awareness of concussions were behind the decision. Photo: Associated Press/Marcio Jose Sanchez

RONALD BLUM, AP Sports Writer

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. (AP) — Major League Baseball plans to eliminate home plate collisions.

New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson, chairman of the rules committee, made the announcement Wednesday at the winter meetings. He said player health and increased awareness of concussions were behind the decision.

Alderson said the exact wording had not been determined.

He said the rule will be given to owners for approval at their January meeting.

Approval of the players’ union is needed for the rules change to be effective for 2014.

MLB could make the change without union approval for 2015.

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An Indian school boy eats a midday meal provided free at a government school in Hyderabad, India, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013. India has offered free midday school meals since the 1960s in an effort to persuade poor parents to send their children to school, a program that reaches some 120 million children. The country now plans to subsidize wheat, rice and cereals for some 800 million people under a $20 billion scheme to cut malnutrition and ease poverty.

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