News

Jury still deliberating Sean Taylor slaying case

Jury still deliberating Sean Taylor slaying case

MURDER TRIAL: Defense attorney Janese Caruthers and Eric Rivera Jr., left, listen as Judge Dennis Murphy, adjourns court for the day after the jury finished deliberations with out reaching a verdict. Rivera is charged in the 2007 slaying of former Washington Redskins star Sean Taylor. Photo: Associated Press/El Nuevo Herald, Pedro Portal

MIAMI (AP) — A South Florida jury is back for a third day of deliberations in the trial of a man accused of fatally shooting Washington Redskins star Sean Taylor during an ill-fated 2007 burglary.

Jurors wanted to quit early Thursday because some had planned Halloween trick-or-treat outings with their children.

They were scheduled to resume debating the fate of 23-year-old Eric Rivera Jr. on Friday morning.

Rivera is accused of murder and armed burglary and could get a life prison sentence if convicted. He confessed to police that he shot Taylor during the attempted burglary, but he testified in his own defense that the confession was improperly coerced.

Four other young men from the Fort Myers area were charged, and one has pleaded guilty. The other three will stand trial later.

Recent Headlines

in Sports

This week’s top sports shots

little

A look at the biggest stories and best photography in sports this week.

in Sports

This weekend’s sports schedule

yankees

A complete look at this weekend's sports schedule.

in National

Making headlines this week

surf

A look at the week's biggest newsmakers and the stories you won't soon forget.

in National

WATCH: The history of Labor Day

21-overlay4

While you take your three day weekend, remember those who struggled to get Friday and Saturday off.

in Lifestyle

Rice replaces ice in India bucket challenge

An Indian school boy eats a midday meal provided free at a government school in Hyderabad, India, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013. India has offered free midday school meals since the 1960s in an effort to persuade poor parents to send their children to school, a program that reaches some 120 million children. The country now plans to subsidize wheat, rice and cereals for some 800 million people under a $20 billion scheme to cut malnutrition and ease poverty.

The famous "ice bucket" challenge is inspiring thousands of Indians to follow suit, but with a twist - they are replacing ice with rice to help the country's hungry people.