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Judge orders man to stop procreating

Judge orders man to stop procreating

FOUR IS ENOUGH:An Ohio appeals court has upheld a judge's order that a deadbeat father can't have more kids until he pays his back child support. Photo: clipart.com

ELYRIA, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio appeals court has upheld a judge’s order that a deadbeat father can’t have more kids until he pays his back child support.

The decision this week by the 9th District Court of Appeals didn’t provide an opinion about whether the judge’s order was appropriate. Instead the appeals court said it didn’t have enough information to decide the merits of the case without a copy of the pre-sentence report detailing Asim Taylor’s background.

In January 2013, Lorain County Probate Judge James Walther said Taylor couldn’t have more children while he is on probation for five years. The judge said the order would be lifted if Taylor pays nearly $100,000 in overdue support for his four children.

The Elyria Chronicle-Telegram reports that Taylor’s attorney is arguing that the order violates his right to reproduce.

According to reports, Taylor has four children.

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