News

City says Sriracha plant too hot to handle

City says Sriracha plant too hot to handle

TOO HOT TO HANDLE: The makers of the popular Sriracha hot sauce are facing a lawsuit.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The maker of Sriracha hot sauce is under fire for allegedly fouling the air around its Southern California factory.

The city of Irwindale filed a lawsuit Monday asking a judge to stop production at the Huy Fong Foods factory, claiming the chili odor emanating from the plant is a public nuisance.

City officials say residents have been complaining of burning eyes, irritated throats and headaches and that some people have had to leave their house to escape the smell.

The lawsuit says the company initially cooperated with the city, but later denied there was an odor problem.

The Los Angeles Times reports production for the year’s sauce occurs between September and December.

Hoy Fong’s green-capped chili bottles are hugely popular.

A company representative wasn’t available for comment.

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