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Beatles’ ‘Yesterday’ piano up for auction

Beatles’ ‘Yesterday’ piano up for auction

UP FOR AUCTION: The famous piano is expected to fetch about $80,000 at auction. Paul McCartney (above) used it to compose "Yesterday." Photo: Associated Press

A piano on which Sir Paul McCartney composed the Beatles’ hit “Yesterday” is set to go under the hammer later this month.

The legendary musician famously came up with the melody for the song in his sleep, and he reportedly spent more than a year working on it with pianos and a guitar.

A 1907 Bechstein Concert Grand piano which was used in the process, and is now owned by “Help!” moviemaker Richard Lester, is expected to fetch $80,000 when it goes up for auction.

A spokesman for Omega Auctions in England says, “The piano is a fantastic piece of Beatles history. It’s amazing to think that “Yesterday,” a song we all know and love, was written on it.

“It was undoubtedly been (sic) used by a number of other important stars of stage and film but most significantly it was used by Lennon and McCartney during the filming of ‘Help!’”

The auction will take place in the Beatles’ hometown of Liverpool, England on March 20.

“Yesterday” was released in August 1965 and was a No. 1 hit in America.

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